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https://medium.com/medium-long/b695860cb6d6

...but look, I can’t conduct diplomacy on an open source [basis]. That’s not how the world works.

I find this quote telling. If our moral and technological advancements haven't reached parity, maybe one reason is that we're still too attached to the way things have been done. Underthinking the consequences of technology can be dangerous, but overthinking them can be equally so, if our thinking is too rigid.

Contrary to our president, I'd argue that diplomacy, along with all other aspects of government, should be made as open-sourced as possible. The Internet and electronic voting allows for a far greater degree of direct democracy, if our model of democracy is flexible enough. Our communities, too, can be open-sourced, and use social networking technology as a way to prevent harm.

I'm not quite saying "Justice? There's an app for that", because there's an obvious hole in that logic. Not everyone can own a computer, let alone a fast internet connection and a smartphone. But we can make justice a much greater part of our technological infrastructure. For one thing, I'd like to see a return of public phone booths, adapted for current technology, free to use, and deployed on a large scale.

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( 1 comment — Leave a comment )
silveradept
Dec. 28th, 2013 05:42 am (UTC)
Not just for direct democracy, but the security aspects as well. A government and process that is open and can be audited in all ways by any actor will very quickly have flaws and vulnerabilities discovered and sunlight shone in many dark places. And then the patches start arriving, and what gets built is better.
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